All in a day’s remote work

Disrupting the future of work was something we expected the robots to do and, to an extent, they did as well. But then Covid-19 entered the party in …

Disrupting the future of work was something we expected the robots to do and, to an extent, they did as well.

But then Covid-19 entered the party in style, sweeping everyone off their feet and becoming the talk of the town. Sure, the shift didn’t come through humans getting replaced by machines, as the essays often warned us, but through remote work creeping into the mainstream corporate culture. The shift came nonetheless, causing disruption in the truest sense of the word.

Soon after, most professional organisations switched to working from home, even trying to use it as an easy marketing strategy about how much they care about their employees. Meanwhile, the tech evangelists saw this change as an opportunity to point out that the future belongs to their industry.

But for the most part, initially none of us really thought (or at least hoped) that the outbreak would get this bad and we’d be restricted to the four walls for this long. Eventually, we ran out of patience, so the handshakes became more frequent and the face masks less.

With that came the question: what’s the future of work now? Opinions of executives across the biggest corporate names show a wide range, with Netflix’s Reed Hastings calling remote work “a pure negative” while the likes of Zapier and GitHub were on the other end of the spectrum even long before it was cool. That debate, like most others, didn’t really develop the same way in Pakistan. Or if it did, no one beyond the 30 self-styled “thought leaders” on LinkedIn knew about it.

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